Tag Archives: command prompt

Python pip – How to get around Fatal error in launcher: Unable to create process using ‘”‘

On some Windows machines pip has a problem caused by spaces in the Python installation path.
When you try:

Note: replace tweepy with the Python package you are trying to install. You will not receive the same output as in this example tweepy is already install via pip!

pip install tweepy

or any other package you get the following error returned:

Fatal error in launcher: Unable to create process using ‘”‘

The first thing you want to do is make sure you update pip:

python -m pip install -U pip

Now if you run:

python -m pip install tweepy

Your package should install.

If that fails, type python into your Windows command prompt to bring up the python command prompt. When you have the python command prompt displaying >>> type:

>>> import pip

Then when the python prompt returns >>> type:


This should workaround the issue an give you back the power of Python pip

Compiling a C Program from Visual C++ 2015 Command Prompt

For quick compiling of C/C++ programs on a Windows PC,  the Visual C++ 2015 Command Prompt is your go to program. Many programs have no need for development in an IDE.

Before you can compile a c/c++ program you will need to install the Microsoft Visual C++ Build Tools 2015.

Once installed you will have a new list of shortcuts in your Start Menu.

Visual C++ Build Tools Start Menu Shortcuts
Visual C++ Build Tools Start Menu Shortcuts

If you right click on any one of the Visual C++ 2015 Programs and choose Open File Location you will also see the extensive list of tools.

Visual C++ Build Tools Explorer Shortcuts
Visual C++ Build Tools Explorer Shortcuts

Depending on what system architecture you are running, open one of the programs. If in doubt select:
Visual C++ 2015 x86 Native Build Tools  Command Prompt
Visual C++ 2015 x64  x86 cross Build Tools  Command Prompt

The following window will appear:

Visual C++ 2015 Build Tools Command Prompt
Visual C++ 2015 Build Tools Command Prompt

To verify that the prompt is functioning property, type cl and the prompt will output the exact same information again.
Note: You can use the Visual C++ 2015 Build Tools Command Prompt the same way you would use the standard command prompt for directory navigation.

  1. To test a simple C program, first create a test directory to hold your test program. md c:\test to create a directory, and then enter cd c:\test to change to that directory. This is where your source files and executable will be stored.
  2. Type notepad test.c  When the  Notepad alert dialog  pops up, choose Yes to create the new test.c file in your current working directory.
  3. In Notepad, enter the following code and save as test.c:
#include <stdio.h>
int main()
printf("Hello World!\n");
getchar(); //used to prevent executable from closing when double clicked
return ;
  1. Now from the Visual C++ Build Tools Command Prompt type: cl test.c. If the program compiled successfully you will see: /out:test.exe and test.obj. In your test folder you will now have the test.c source file along with test.obj and test.exe
  2. To run your newly compiled program simply type test and your program will run in the command prompt. You can also double click the test.exe executable.

To compile a program with more than one source file simply type:

cl test.c test2.c test3.c

The compiler will output a single file called file test.c
To change the name of the output program, add an /out linker option:

cl test.c test2.c test3.c /link /out:mynewprogram.exe

test.c source file

Linux: How To Identify The Linux Kernel Version?

The Kernel version is broken down into three parts:

  1. Major Number
  2. Minor Number
  3. Revision Number

The Current Linux Kernel versions (June 2014) are:

  • 3.14.5 (Stable – Maintained by Greg Kroah-Hartman)
  • 3.15-rc8 (Development – Linus Torvalds)

The first number(3) is the major revision to the Linux Kernel. The second number(14) shows the minor revision. Development Kernels are odd and production kernels are even. Development kernels are not fully tested and can be unstable. Once a development Kernel is thoroughly tested and deemed stable is will be given an even number x.1.x → x.2.x or x.3.x → x.4.x
Since the Linux Kernel is constantly being improved and revised a revision number(5) is added when smaller changes are made.

How to tell which Linux Kernel you are running?
From your Linux Terminal type:

  • uname -r
  • cat /proc/version
  • rpm -q kernel              (If you arte running Red Hat package manager)
  • dmesg | grep Linux
  • ls /boot                           (look for vmlinuz.x.x-x)

I hope this helps explain Linux Kernel versions.

Linux Commands In Windows 8.1

Basic Linux file commands working in Windows 8.1
Some commands have always been the same for both Operating Systems* but now you can use whichever you prefer when working with files. Below are a few common ones that I have verified working in Windows 8.1.

ls, cd*, pwd, mkdir*, rm, cp, mv, touch, cat, ps, head, tail, date*, whoami, finger, uname -a, du, chmod, grep, find -iname, exit*, echo*